Top 9 Trending Attractions in gay LISBON with our visitors.

Perched on the coast of Portugal and steeped in a rich and diverse marine history, it’s no wonder that many of Lisbon’s attractions are of the aquatic variety. The historical heart of Lisbon can be seen today in the Baixa, or lower town, its narrow winding streets dominated by the Sao Jorge Castle. Not much remains inside the castle walls, but it is worth a visit for the stunning views over the rest of the city. You should also visit the nearby cathedral of Santa Maria Maior, more commonly known as the Se.

1. The Alfama quarter

The oldest part of Lisbon, the Alfama quarter sprawls down the hillside from below the Castelo de Sao Jorge, retaining much of the traditional colour and atmosphere from the days when it was the ancient seat of the Saracens.

Along the narrow cobblestone alleyways are taverns and street markets, interspersed with close-packed houses still occupied by stevedores, fishmongers and sailors. At the edge of the Alfama, Lisbon’s renowned flea market, the Feira da Ladra, is held in the Campo de Santa Clara every Tuesday and Saturday.

The Alfama is also full of historic buildings and churches, which are well worth exploring. Some of the buildings display fading coats of arms, which bear testimony to the fact that the Alfama was once home to aristocrats. At night the Alfama takes on a more mysterious aspect with street lanterns throwing shadows on the medieval walls, and it is advisable to avoid the area after dark in favour of the Bairro Alto café and nightclub district.

2. The Bairro Alto District

The Bairro Alto district (literally the Upper City) is, like the Alfama, an historic enclave dating from 1513, which is reached in a novel way via the Santa Justa Elevator (a structure reminiscent of the Eiffel tower in Paris) from the lower city.

The colourful district resounds to the calls of vendors and fishmongers, and the windows and balconies are festooned with laundry and bird cages. At night the area comes alive with some of the finest fado cafes in the city, along streets lit by Victorian lanterns.

Fado is the famous brand of music and dance brought to Portugal by African slaves in the 19th century, characterised by songs of sadness and despair, and there is no better place in Portugal to experience this musical genre than in the Bairro Alto of Lisbon.

3. Castle of St George

No trip to Lisbon would be complete without a tip to castle of st. George, sitting high on top of a hill looking down on Lisbon the views from this vantage point are spectacular, it’s like having the whole of Lisbon at your finger tips.

Originally a citadel and the palace of king Afonso Henriques after he conquered the Moors in 1147 the castle is steeped in history. If you want to learn more of the castles history then you may enjoy the multimedia exhibit on Lisbon’s history called Olissiponia.

Shown in three underground chambers with the images projected onto 10foot walls it is well worth taking the time to watch. As you stroll though the gardens you will see peacocks, ducks and geese roaming the grounds. The one thing you must not forget to do on your trip to the castle is to clime one of the 18 towers that lead to the ramparts and take in the views of Lisbon city..

4. Monument to the discoveries

One of the most famous sights in Lisbon is the imposing monument, situated on the riverbank in the Avenida de Brasilia in the district of Belem, designed to commemorate the Portuguese Age of Discovery.

Belem, where the Tagus meets the sea, is the point from which the maritime explorers of yore set forth in their sailing ships to discover the world. The monument was unveiled in 1960 on the 500th anniversary of the death of Prince Henry the Navigator in 1460, the monarch who was largely responsible for Portugal’s role in world exploration during the 15th and 16th centuries.

The massive monument takes the form of a caravel with Prince Henry at the prow, backed by images of renowned mariners, royal patrons and others who participated in the golden age of discovery.

5. The Bairro Alto District

The Bairro Alto district (literally the Upper City) is, like the Alfama, an historic enclave dating from 1513, which is reached in a novel way via the Santa Justa Elevator (a structure reminiscent of the Eiffel tower in Paris) from the lower city.

The colourful district resounds to the calls of vendors and fishmongers, and the windows and balconies are festooned with laundry and bird cages. At night the area comes alive with some of the finest fado cafes in the city, along streets lit by Victorian lanterns.

Fado is the famous brand of music and dance brought to Portugal by African slaves in the 19th century, characterised by songs of sadness and despair, and there is no better place in Portugal to experience this musical genre than in the Bairro Alto of Lisbon.

6. Exhibition Park

Lisbon’s exhibition park was upgraded and renamed for the Expo ’98 world exposition, which revitalized the city and brought international tourists and interest flooding in.

The site is now worthy of a full day’s sightseeing, featuring several attractions, not least of which is the Lisbon Oceanarium with its 15,000 living examples of marine life. The main tank holds enough water to fill four Olympic-sized swimming pools, and is viewed from two floors through curved glass panels that provide a 180-degree view.

Another popular diversion is the Virtual Reality Pavilion, which showcases the Portuguese age of discovery. Other attractions include a science centre, cable car, the Vasco da Gama Tower and numerous bars and restaurants offering Portuguese cuisine.

7. Lisbon Oceanarium

One of the biggest aquariums in the world with 5 million liters of water used to recreate 4 of the world’s oceans; you will find all the fish and mammals in each of the oceans like penguins in the Antarctic and otters playing in the waters of the Pacific.

This is a must visit for anyone that likes wild life, the building is self is a work of art in stone and glass.

Open from 10am to 8pm (summer) and daily 10am to 7pm (winter)

8. Se Cathedral

The first Church to be built in Lisbon, the patron stain of Lisbon (St Anthony) was baptized and later buried here; the inside houses treasures from the 12th and 13th century it is worth taking the time to see the cloister a small charge may apply but worth paying.

Open from Tuesday to Saturday 9am to 7pm, Sunday and Monday 9am to 5pm

9. Tower of Belem

One of the biggest aquariums in the world with 5 million liters of water used to recreate 4 of the world’s oceans; you will find all the fish and mammals in each of the oceans like penguins in the Antarctic and otters playing in the waters of the Pacific.

This is a must visit for anyone that likes wild life, the building is self is a work of art in stone and glass.

Open from 10am to 8pm (summer) and daily 10am to 7pm (winter)

Top Trending Hotels in LISBON with our visitors.

Check out the most popular hotels with our guests this past 7 days in Lisbon. Hotels in Lisbon are cheaper than other larger European cities so you can get great deals on some luxury hotels. If you are on a budget, then Lisbon has great hostels located in some of the most historic buildings in the city. Many have been recently redecorated with a luxury feel.

Lisboa Carmo Hotel

Great Location, Luxury Finish

Lisboa Carmo Hotel

Soundproofed, all rooms at the Second Floor B&B have either a balcony or a view of the Coliseum. Each includes a safe, flat-screen TV and fridge.

HF Fenix Garden

Design Hotel – Great Facilities

HF Fenix Garden

HF Fenix Garden sells fast on our website. The stylish Hotel Fenix Garden is situated on the Marquês de Pombal Square in the centre of Lisbon.

SANA Lisboa Hotel

Great Views, Spacious Rooms

SANA Lisboa Hotel

SANA Lisboa Hotel rooms are decorated in a contemporary style and have views over the Old City and offering spacious en suite rooms.

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